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PREVIOUS
FEATURED
MEMBERS

Get to know the members of Division 51 by viewing a collection of our previous featured members here.

If you would like to nominate a fellow member to be featured, please reach out to callieemims@gmail.com with their name and contact info.

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Meet graduate student member
Joseph Anderson-Gutiérrez 

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining? 

I joined Division 51 in 2016 when I was a sophomore in undergrad. During that year, I developed my academic interest in gender roles and how they interact with specific groups and identities, which led me to begin working with Dr. Angela Sabates on a project examining hypermasculinity within religious communities. As the project progressed, I wanted to connect to all the resources that were available to me, which led me to become a student member of Division 51. 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division? 

One of the most valuable benefits of being a member of the division is having access to the latest research on men and masculinities, which has been incredibly propelling for my research and clinical interests. Additionally, being connected to the community of researchers, clinicians, and educators passionate about the work on men and masculinity via the listserv, social media, conference meetings/presentations, etc. is exciting and motivates me to continue my own work in this field. It’s energizing to see the level of collaboration between members of the division and how this leg of psychology continues to expand and transform. It’s an honor to be a part of this psychological movement. 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?    

My past and current research interests include gender-based violence, dimensions of masculinity in religious congregations, the interaction of spirituality in emerging adults, and the psychopathology at play in certain gender identities. More specifically, my research examines the ideologies influenced by cultural factors and how the associated perceptions, behaviors, and emotions impact intergroup relations. My current doctoral work is focusing on the anxieties and other psychopathology associated with the masculine gender identity. Finally, I will be teaching a course on sexuality and am eager to integrate the research housed in Division 51 and how it connects to sexual and gender identity psychosocial development. 

 

Clinically, I am passionate about working with sexual, gender, and racial minority populations. I feel that since I have been given the privilege of being trained as a clinical psychologist, I want to do all that I can to provide services and resources to communities that have been shown to have a more difficult time receiving mental health services and psychoeducation. Gender and gender roles are extremely relevant to those populations, so my knowledge and awareness of the psychology of men and masculinity will be at the forefront of my clinical work.

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Meet graduate student member
Kevin Hilke

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?


I joined about six months ago to become more familiar with expert research and theorizing around men and masculinity that takes a non-essentializing, intersectional approach to understanding male identity. As a clinician who works with a wide range of folks who were sexually assaulted as children, my practice has sensitized me to the need for such an intersectionally feminist approach as a prerequisite to developing psychological services that are humble toward and competently tailored to the full range of human beings—including men. Indeed, a solid chunk of my clients are male survivors of chronic child rape. This group of survivors has been rendered effectively invisible by our culture’s pseudo-delusional masculinist ideals of male hypersexualization, impenetrability, and strength, and by the persistently widespread heterosexist myths that a penis is both required to commit rape and magically protects one from rape. While innovations in feminist trauma theory and practice in recent decades have done a great deal to bring needed attention and treatment to female survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and sexual violence in general, research shows unambiguously that boys and men are sexually assaulted, too, and require psychotherapy treatments that are just as trauma-informed, developmentally-attuned, and radically individualized. I’m hoping that exposure to the thinking of Division 51 members will inform and improve my holding of men and masculinity and my clinical practice, and eventually assist me and colleagues working in this area to develop approaches that attend to male survivors’ universal humanity and vulnerability, but also to the idiosyncratic expressions of psychopathology we see clinically when the humanity of a specifically male-bodied person is violated.

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

 

I avoided joining for a while—despite specializing in working with male survivors—out of what now seems a mistaken impression that the bulk of the membership is hostile toward intersectional feminist thinking on gender, a core element of my approach to ethical clinical practice, research, and theory. I have encountered some dismissive, retrogressive, scientifically questionable essentializing of this kind here, but for the most part this community seems to understand, value, and rigorously engage with theories that prioritize intersectionality, recognizing both the socially constructed realities of gender and their existence and constitution within a broader sociocultural context where gender is but one important index of power relations. I am relatively new to the Division, and so haven’t had long to assess comparative value across member benefits, but having located a community of scholars who are largely conversant in these ideas and expert in men and masculinities with whom I can confer on any number of research or clinical issues has already proven immensely valuable.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?


My clinical work centers on psychotherapy with survivors of complex trauma of all forms, but I’ve come to specialize in working with adult survivors of chronic, severe child sexual abuse from a trauma-informed, intersectionally feminist, relational psychodynamic perspective. My research examines historical clinical mishandling of post-traumatic, dissociative presentations, especially in survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). I’m presently looking at the historical inability of many practitioners to correctly identify child rape when it presents in the clinical situation, particularly when the survivor is male, and particularly when the perpetrator is a female caregiver. This destructive masculinist tradition stretches back (at least) to Freud’s restyling of his own rape by a nursemaid as a toddler as a fortunate opportunity to which he sadly failed to measure up.

Meet graduate student member
Karley Richard

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

 

I joined Division 51 before my senior year in undergrad at PSU (2018). I started on Dr. Sonia Molloy’s research team and would help code transcripts from her fathering research. I would talk with her about my clinical and research interests which intersected with the mission of Division 51. After meeting a few more members through my work with Dr. Molloy, I was eager to connect with and learn from other division members. The professional connections, mentors, and friendships I have made through D51 have truly contributed to my personal and professional development.    

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

 

The relationships I have developed in this division have been so valuable to me. Through the mentorship program, I was matched with Dr. Will Elder. His mentorship has been instrumental in developing my clinical conceptualization. We have spent countless hours discussing masculine identities and gender roles/norms. I believe this relationship has benefitted my clinical practice, particularly in rural Appalachia where many of my clients are exploring issues and questions related to their masculine identity.  I have also had the privilege of chairing the student Academic Outreach Committee which has focused on developing a database of resources relevant to the psychological study of men and masculinities. While I have learned a lot through the collection of resources, I have valued building relationships with other students in the division.  

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?

 

I am clinically interested in working with military members and veterans. I am interested in considering how gender norms and values impact my client’s presenting problems and concerns. It has been awesome watching my clients deconstruct their rigid perceptions of identity in favor of adopting a more flexible interpretation of their own masculine/feminine identity.

 

As the military is a male-dominated institution, I am interested in considering how traditional masculine ideologies impact the health and wellbeing of active-duty military members and veterans. I am also interested in how gendered expectations impact women and gender-diverse identities in these communities. In a study with Dr. Sonia Molloy, we conducted a qualitative analysis examining emerging adult military men and their perceptions of masculinity, femininity, minority military members, and military culture. This research experience has fueled my interest in qualitatively examining the experiences and perceptions of marginalized groups in male-dominated settings. My ultimate goal would be to contribute to the development of intervention and policy promoting the safe inclusion of marginalized groups in military settings.

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Meet Division 51 member
Dr. Chen Oren

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

 

I joined division 51 around 2003.  My mentor and friend, Mark Stevens introduced me to the division, retreat, and board meetings.  I quickly found a home in the division and established personal and professional relationships motivating me to be more involved in the division and the study and practice of men and masculinity.  I became a board member, conference chair in 2007, San Francisco (highlighted by the collaboration with division 35 and Jean Kilbourne as keynote speaker), and treasurer for 4 years.  I resonated with the focus of understanding the needs of men and how to best support, help and conduct effective therapy with men.  I enjoyed reading, writing, attending, and presenting at conferences as well as helping men in my private practice. 

 

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

 

I most value the balance between professional and personal life at the division.I enjoyed the comradery and friends I developed during division retreats, conferences and meetings, including Mark Stevens, Fred Rabinowitz, Matt Englar-Carlson, and Danny Singley to name a few. The ability to be vulnerable, share and hear intimate aspects of other men’s life, while also having the opportunity to collaborate and grow as a professional by writing, presenting, and working with men has been a great experience for me.

 

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?  

 

Initially while I was teaching, I focused on gender and male socialization.I also presented and researched positive psychology and men, the experience of male psychology students and fathering.My wife, Dora Chase Oren and I co-edited the book Counseling Fathers, 2010, with contributions from many of our division members.When my children reached elementary school age, I shifted my focus and career to full time private practice so I can spend more time and be more involved in my children’s lives.I have been applying the research and theoretical knowledge I gained to my clinical practice.Large percentage of my private practice consists of men in different formats including individual, couples and group therapy.I have been co-facilitating a men’s group with Mark Stevens for almost 15 years which is one of the highlights of our week.

Meet Division 51 member
Dr. Fred Rabinowitz

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

 

I co-led one the first therapeutic men's groups at the University of Missouri with Sam Cochran when we were graduate students in 1983.  With very little written at the time about men's issues, Sam and I began our exploration of the ideas that men and boys needed a different kind of therapeutic approach because of their socialization and how it had impacted how they perceived themselves and their interactions with others.  Sam and I wrote and presented at various psychology and counseling conferences discussing these ideas and were drawn into a group of psychologists from the American Psychological Association led by Ron Levant and Gary Brooks who created the Society for the Psychological Study of Men and Masculinities in the 1990's.   Sam and I presented our ideas and findings at our division meetings at APA on a regular basis.  I enjoyed the comradery of the 51 group, including the midwinter conferences that were run in an interpersonal group retreat format.  Division 51 became the "go to" place to discuss ideas about masculinity and have a platform at APA and the greater society to highlight men's issues and concerns.

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

 

Honestly, I really enjoy the individuals (men and women) who are a part of the division. It has been a wonderful place to talk about gender and get a more nuanced and scientific understanding of relationships, the impact of men's and women's social roles, and how society could be changed by incorporating the scholarship this division was generating.  I have looked forward to attending Division 51 sessions at the annual live APA conference and loved the midwinter retreats that allowed us to know each other on a more intimate level.  Our division journal has been an excellent source of scientific and theoretical articles about masculinities. From the beginning of my involvement, I have felt encouraged and empowered to take on leadership positions, having served as the 51 President in 2006 and the "team captain" of a group of psychologists who created the recently published Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Men and Boys for APA, a 13-year project.

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?  

 

I have been a professor of Psychology at the University of Redlands since 1984 and been actively involved in both scholarship and practice aspects of men's issues.  I have written and co-written five books on masculinity related themes:  Man Alive: A Primer of Men's Issues (1994) with past 51 President Sam Cochran; Men and Depression (2000) with Sam Cochran; Deepening Psychotherapy with Men (2002) with Sam Cochran; Breaking Barriers in Counseling Men (2014) with past 51 President Aaron Rochlen; and Deepening Group Psychotherapy with Men (2019).  I have led a weekly therapeutically oriented men's group and maintained a private practice specializing in men's issues in Redlands, CA since 1986.  I am currently working with recent 51 President Daniel Ellenberg on a practical book about increasing male self-awareness, expanding male flexibility, and encouraging optimal psychological functioning we are calling "Strength with Heart."

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Meet Division 51 member
Dr. William Elder

When did you join Division 51? What made you interested in joining?

 

I joined Division 51 in 2004, as a senior in college. I was a Gender Studies and Psych double major and fascinated by the psychology of men and masculinities. I didn't realize there was an APA division devoted to the study, and there were no faculty at my university with that particular interest. One day I was in the library, looking for books for a paper, when I stumbled upon The New Handbook of Psychotherapy and Counseling with Men (published in 2001 by Brooks and Good). I sat on the floor in amazement. I realized there were psychologists across the country who were creating research and training clinicians to understand how male-identified people could be best served in therapy. The book guided me to the Division, and it informed where I decided to apply to graduate school. I now have those books in my home office as a reminder of how I found my way.   

 

What do you find most valuable about being a member of the division?

I most value the relationships I've found within the division. Members have been kind, helpful, and inspired me with new ideas. I have found mentors and peers that have been my team--not only in research, but in clinical development, and professional steps. There are so many brilliant people, with no formal responsibility to help me, who simply have been generous with their time when I've asked for help. For example, Jim O'Neil helped me design my senior thesis in college; Gary Brooks was my graduate school advisor and guided me through my masters and doctoral dissertations; Will Liu has led conversations that challenge the way I think about intersectional masculinities; Michael Addis has a brilliant mind for considering context, power, and masculinities; Andrew Smiler helped me understand how to measure masculinities; Holly Sweet taught me about masculinities and self-compassion. The list goes on and on. Get involved and connect with these people!          

 

What are your clinical, teaching, research, or other applied interests relating to the psychology of men and masculinity?  

Research-wise, I am primarily a grounded theory (qualitative) researcher and am fascinated by the impact of power systems on mental health. I've published studies about sexual minority masculinities, as well as masculinities and trauma. I'm grateful to be on the board of the Division 51 journal, Psychology of Men and Masculinities. 

 

In my clinical work, I'm a psychologist in the PTSD Clinical Team at the South Texas VA, where I primarily serve men from non-dominant racial and ethnic identities with a history of interpersonal trauma. I'm also on the Training Committee and supervise interns and post-docs with interest in intersectionality and trauma treatment.